Linen Like Paper Table Covers

Linen Like Paper Table Covers : Bed Linen Store.

Linen Like Paper Table Covers

linen like paper table covers

    covers

  • (cover) provide with a covering or cause to be covered; “cover her face with a handkerchief”; “cover the child with a blanket”; “cover the grave with flowers”
  • (cover) screen: a covering that serves to conceal or shelter something; “a screen of trees afforded privacy”; “under cover of darkness”; “the brush provided a covert for game”; “the simplest concealment is to match perfectly the color of the background”
  • Put something such as a cloth or lid on top of or in front of (something) in order to protect or conceal it
  • Envelop in a layer of something, esp. dirt
  • Scatter a layer of loose material over (a surface, esp. a floor), leaving it completely obscured
  • (cover) blanket: bedding that keeps a person warm in bed; “he pulled the covers over his head and went to sleep”

    linen

  • Garments or other household articles such as sheets made, or originally made, of linen
  • a fabric woven with fibers from the flax plant
  • a high-quality paper made of linen fibers or with a linen finish
  • Cloth woven from flax
  • white goods or clothing made with linen cloth

    paper

  • Wallpaper
  • a material made of cellulose pulp derived mainly from wood or rags or certain grasses
  • cover with paper; “paper the box”
  • A newspaper
  • Material manufactured in thin sheets from the pulp of wood or other fibrous substances, used for writing, drawing, or printing on, or as wrapping material
  • composition: an essay (especially one written as an assignment); “he got an A on his composition”

    table

  • a set of data arranged in rows and columns; “see table 1”
  • a piece of furniture having a smooth flat top that is usually supported by one or more vertical legs; “it was a sturdy table”
  • Postpone consideration of
  • Present formally for discussion or consideration at a meeting
  • postpone: hold back to a later time; “let’s postpone the exam”

linen like paper table covers – White Linen

White Linen Like Paper Banquet Table Covers – 24 Count
White Linen Like Paper Banquet Table Covers - 24 Count
White disposable Linen-Like® tablecloths are constructed from a lightweight paper material. The texture of these paper table covers is similar to real cloth linen. These elegant white Linen Like table covers are designed to fit standard rectangular banquet tables with a length of 6 Feet (1.83 Meters) to 8 Feet (2.44 Meters). Linen Like products are popular for weddings and other more formal events. Table Cover Size: 50 Inches x 108 Inches or 127cm x 274.32cm Case Quantity: 24 White Disposable Linen Like Tablecloths

Fáinleóga – Swallows (4)

Fáinleóga - Swallows (4)
THE HAPPY PRINCE

High above the city, on a tall column, stood the statue of the Happy Prince. He was gilded all over with thin leaves of fine gold, for eyes he had two bright sapphires, and a large red ruby glowed on his sword-hilt. He was very much admired indeed. "He is as beautiful as a weathercock," remarked one of the Town Councillors who wished to gain a reputation for having artistic tastes; "only not quite so useful," he added, fearing lest people should think him unpractical, which he really was not.

"Why can’t you be like the Happy Prince?" asked a sensible mother of her little boy who was crying for the moon. "The Happy Prince never dreams of crying for anything."

"I am glad there is someone in the world who is quite happy," muttered a disappointed man as he gazed at the wonderful statue.

"He looks just like an angel," said the Charity Children as they came out of the cathedral in their bright scarlet cloaks and their clean white pinafores.

"How do you know?" said the Mathematical Master, "you have never seen one."

"Ah! but we have, in our dreams," answered the children; and the Mathematical Master frowned and looked very severe, for he did not approve of children dreaming.

One night there flew over the city a little Swallow. His friends had gone away to Egypt six weeks before, but he had stayed behind, for he was in love with the most beautiful Reed. He had met her early in the spring as he was flying down the river after a big yellow moth, and had been so attracted by her slender waist that he had stopped to talk to her.

"Shall I love you?" said the Swallow, who liked to come to the point at once, and the Reed made him a low bow. So he flew round and round her, touching the water with his wings, and making silver ripples. This was his courtship, and it lasted all through the summer.

"It is a ridiculous attachment," twittered the other Swallows; "she has no money, and far too many relations"; and indeed the river was quite full of Reeds. Then, when the autumn came they all flew away.

After they had gone he felt lonely, and began to tire of his lady-love. "She has no conversation," he said, "and I am afraid that she is a coquette, for she is always flirting with the wind." And certainly, whenever the wind blew, the Reed made the most graceful curtseys. "I admit that she is domestic," he continued, "but I love travelling, and my wife, consequently, should love travelling also."

"Will you come away with me?" he said finally to her; but the Reed shook her head, she was so attached to her home.

"You have been trifling with me," he cried. "I am off to the Pyramids. Good-bye!" and he flew away.

All day long he flew, and at night-time he arrived at the city. "Where shall I put up?" he said; "I hope the town has made preparations."

Then he saw the statue on the tall column.

"I will put up there," he cried; "it is a fine position, with plenty of fresh air." So he alighted just between the feet of the Happy Prince.

"I have a golden bedroom," he said softly to himself as he looked round, and he prepared to go to sleep; but just as he was putting his head under his wing a large drop of water fell on him. "What a curious thing!" he cried; "there is not a single cloud in the sky, the stars are quite clear and bright, and yet it is raining. The climate in the north of Europe is really dreadful. The Reed used to like the rain, but that was merely her selfishness."

Then another drop fell.

"What is the use of a statue if it cannot keep the rain off?" he said; "I must look for a good chimney-pot," and he determined to fly away.

But before he had opened his wings, a third drop fell, and he looked up, and saw – Ah! what did he see?

The eyes of the Happy Prince were filled with tears, and tears were running down his golden cheeks. His face was so beautiful in the moonlight that the little Swallow was filled with pity.

"Who are you?" he said.

"I am the Happy Prince."

"Why are you weeping then?" asked the Swallow; "you have quite drenched me."

"When I was alive and had a human heart," answered the statue, "I did not know what tears were, for I lived in the Palace of Sans-Souci, where sorrow is not allowed to enter. In the daytime I played with my companions in the garden, and in the evening I led the dance in the Great Hall. Round the garden ran a very lofty wall, but I never cared to ask what lay beyond it, everything about me was so beautiful. My courtiers called me the Happy Prince, and happy indeed I was, if pleasure be happiness. So I lived, and so I died. And now that I am dead they have set me up here so high that I can see all the ugliness and all the misery o

Auschwitz 1 Poland ~ today. Includes extensive writeup

Auschwitz 1 Poland ~ today.  Includes extensive writeup
Aushwitz 1 today.
It is peaceful despite the horrors and yes despite what some say the birds do sing here. I like to think they sing for the sleeping

Auschwitz Concentration Camp opened in former Polish army barracks in June 1940. Twenty brick buildings were adapted, of which 6 were two-story and 14 were single-story. At the end of 1940, prisoners began adding second stories to the single-story blocks. The following spring, they started erecting 8 new blocks. This work reached completion in the first half of 1942. The result was a complex of 28 two-story blocks, the overwhelming majority of which were used to house prisoners. As a rule, there were two large rooms upstairs and a number of smaller rooms downstairs. The blocks were designed to hold about 700 prisoners each after the second stories were added, but in practice they housed up to 1,200.

During the first several months, the prisoners’ rooms had neither beds nor any other furniture. Prisoners slept on straw-stuffed mattresses laid on the floor. After reveille in the morning, they piled the mattresses in a corner of the room. The rooms were so overcrowded that prisoners could sleep only on their sides, in three rows. Three-tiered bunks began appearing gradually in the rooms from February 1941. Theoretically designed for three prisoners, they in fact accommodated more. Aside from the beds, the furniture in each block included a dozen or more wooden wardrobes, several tables, and several score stools. Coal-fired tile stoves provided the heating.

In the first months, the prisoners drew water from two wells and relieved themselves in a provisional outdoor latrine. After the rebuilding of the camp, each building had lavatories, usually on the ground floor, containing 22 toilets, urinals, and washbasins with trough-type drains and 42 spigots installed above them. The fact that prisoners from the upstairs and downstairs had to use a single lavatory meant that access was strictly limited.

Two types of barracks, brick and wooden, housed prisoners in the second part of the camp, Birkenau. The brick barracks stood in the oldest part of the camp, known as sector BI, where construction began in the fall of 1941. Inside each of them were 60 brick partitions with three tiers, making a total of 180 sleeping places, referred to as “buks,” designed to accommodate 4 prisoners. The SS therefore envisioned a capacity of over 700 prisoners per block. At first, the buildings had earthen floors. Over time, these were covered with a layer of bricks lying flat, or with a thin layer of poured concrete. The barracks were unheated in the winter. Two iron stoves were indeed installed, but these were insufficient to heat the entire space. Nor were there any sanitary facilities in the barracks. Only in 1944 were sinks and toilets installed in a small area inside each block. Nor was there any electric lighting at the beginning.

Wooden stable-type barracks were installed in segment BI, and above all in segments BII and BIII. These barracks had no windows. Instead, there was a row of skylights on either side at the top. A chimney duct, which heated the interior in the winter, ran almost the entire length of the barracks. The interior was divided into 18 stalls, intended originally for 52 horses. The two stalls nearest the door were reserved for prisoner functionaries, and containers for excrement stood in the two stalls at the far end. Three-tier wooden beds or three-tier wooden bunks intended for 15 prisoners to sleep in were installed in the other stalls, for a total capacity of more than 400 prisoners per barracks.

In the brick blocks, prisoners slept on straw strewn on the boards of the buks; paper mattresses stuffed with so-called “wood wool” were placed on the beds or bunks in the wooden barracks.

The number of prisoners that the barracks were supposed to hold should be treated as only a starting point, since the actual number was often much higher. It varied according to the size and number of transports arriving at any given time.

During the first year or so, water in sector BI was available only in the kitchen barracks, and prisoners had no access to it. Unable to wash, they went around dirty. They had to perform their bodily functions in unscreened outside privies. The barracks were frequently damp, and lice and rats were an enormous problem for the prisoners. It is therefore hardly strange that epidemics of contagious diseases erupted frequently. Sanitary conditions improved to a certain degree in 1943, when each part of the camp was outfitted with a bathhouse and equipment for disinfecting clothing and linen. Nevertheless, the capacity of these facilities in proportion to the number of prisoners limited the possibilities for making use of them. In sector BI, for instance, there were 4 barracks with sinks for washing (90 spigots per barracks), 4 toilet barracks (a sewer with a concrete lid that had 58 toilet openings in it), and 2 barracks containing toilets an

linen like paper table covers

linen like paper table covers

Gold Floral Prestige Linen Like Banquet Table Covers - 24 Count
Gold Prestige disposable Linen-Like® paper banquet tablecloths are constructed from a high quality soft paper material that looks and feels like real linen. The Gold Prestige design features a beautiful gold floral design printed on a solid white table cover. These elegant premium Linen-Like tablecloths are designed to fit standard rectangular banquet tables with a length of 6 Feet (1.83 Meters) to 8 Feet (2.44 Meters). Linen-Like products are an excellent choice for weddings and other more formal events. Tablecloth Size: 50 Inches x 108 Inches or 127cm x 274.32cm Case Quantity: 24 Gold Prestige Disposable Linen-Like Table Covers